Bob Gaglardi School of Business and Economics

Management Diploma

The Management Diploma is a two-year program that helps graduates develop key employment skills in areas such as oral and written communications, problem-solving, accounting, marketing, human relations, economics, law, information systems, and business ethics and readies them for entry-level general administration and sales positions.

Those who complete just the first year will be awarded a Business Foundations Certificate. This qualifies graduates for some entry-level positions, but they are encouraged to continue their education part-time or online if possible.

If you enjoy working with people and are a creative person with good communication skills, this program could be for you.

Learning objectives

Upon completion of this program, students are able to:

  1. Prepare effective business documents including memorandums and short reports.
  2. Solve business problems using complex quantitative techniques.
  3. Describe the environment that businesses operating in, the functions of management, and the role of different management disciplines.
  4. Maintain the financial records of a small business using computerized accounting software.
  5. Utilize spreadsheet and other application software in day-to-day work activities.
  6. Explain how effective management information systems can contribute to an organization’s success.
  7. Discuss how human and interpersonal behaviour theory can be applied to maximize organizational efficiency.
  8. Collect and analyze information to assist management in making more effective operational decisions.
  9. Implement effective human resource practices in an office environment.
  10. Develop a basic marketing plan for a new product or service based on a strong understanding of the 4Ps of product, price, place and promotion.
  11. Apply the basic principles of contract, tort, employment and other areas of business law to decision making.
  12. Demonstrate professional selling practices that maximize company profitability through strong customer service and retention.
  13. Summarize the influence that cultural, economic, political and geographic forces have on international operations and expansion.
  14. Employ ethical principles in management decision making.

Admission requirements

  1. B.C. Grade 12 or mature student status
  2. Foundations Math 12 or Pre-Calculus Math 12 with a C+ minimum or equivalent
  3. English 12/English 12 First Peoples with a minimum of 73 per cent or equivalent

Students may commence their studies while they upgrade their English and Mathematics.

Program content

First year
Fall semester
MATH 1070
Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)(recommended)

MATH 1070 Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is designed for Business and Economics students. Topics include linear and non-linear functions and models applied to cost, revenue, profit, demand and supply, systems of equations (linear and nonlinear), matrices, linear programming, difference equations, and mathematics of finance (including simple and compound interest, annuities, mortgages, and loans).
Prerequisite: Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum grade of C+ or Pre-Calculus 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or equivalent or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0600 or MATH 0610 or MATH 0630 or MATH 0633 or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1091, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101.
For more information, search for this course here.

or
MATH 1100
Finite Math with Applications 1 (3, 1.5, 0)

MATH 1100 Finite Math with Applications 1 (3, 1.5, 0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is intended primarily for Liberal Arts or Tourism students. Students solve problems that have direct relevance in the “real world." Topics to be covered include sets, counting, probability, matrices, linear programming, and math of finance. Prerequisites: Foundations of Math 11 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or Pre-Calculus 11 with a minimum grade of 67% (C+) or Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum grade of 60% (C) or MATH 0510 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0520 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0523 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1090, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101. Science Students do not receive credit for Math 1100.
For more information, search for this course here.

ENGL 1100
Introduction to University Writing (3,0,0)

ENGL 1100 Introduction to University Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the practices of reading and writing in scholarly contexts by investigating a chosen topic or issue. Students read, critically analyze, and synthesize information and ideas found in appropriate secondary sources and coming from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds. They also develop their abilities to communicate knowledge by composing in the genres and sub-genres of scholarly writing, including the incorporation of research and documentation while using a clear, persuasive, grammatically-correct style.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12 /English First Peoples 12 with a minimum 73% or equivalent
Note: students cannot receive credit for both ENGL 1100 and ENGL 1101
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 1710
Introduction to Business (3,0,0)

MNGT 1710 Introduction to Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of many business disciplines such as accounting, finance, marketing, human resource management, supply chain management, and entrepreneurship. Students will engage with community business experts for example guest speakers, who will share their business experience dealing with a wide range of issues. Students will simulate, adapt, and respond to a variety of business challenges, expanding their knowledge of business. Throughout the course students will be encouraged to set goals, reflect on their learning and plan for their futures. Topics include multiple perspectives on business, management functions, forms of business ownership, the importance of entrepreneurship, and Indigenous business.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12/English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent; or ENGL 0600 with minimum C+; or completion of ESAL 0570 and ESAL 0580 with a C+.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MNGT 1711, MNGT 1701 or MNGT 1710
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1220
Introduction to Basic Economics (3,0,0)

ECON 1220 Introduction to Basic Economics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a basic understanding of economic principles, which allows for and encourages informed discussion of media-covered issues. Topics include contrasting macroeconomics and microeconomics; gross domestic product; economic growth and business cycles; unemployment and inflation; aggregate supply and demand; scarcity, opportunity costs, globalization and trade; law of supply and demand; accounting versus economic profits; money and exchange rates; government choices, markets, efficiency, and equity; monopoly and competition; externalities, public goods, and free riders.
Note: Students will not receive credit for ECON 1220 unless it has been completed prior to earning a grade of C- or better in either ECON 1900 or ECON 1950. ECON 1221-Introduction to Basic Economic
For more information, search for this course here.

or
ECON 1900
Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)(recommended)

ECON 1900 Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the interactions between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include a definition of economics; demand and supply analysis; consumer theory; production and cost; market structure including perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly; market efficiency and market failure; resource markets; and international trade.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B OR MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 1900 and ECON 1901
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2210
Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2210 Financial Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to prepare and analyze the financial statements of a public corporation. Topics include the conceptual framework; accounting standards; the accounting cycle; financial statements; internal control, cash and bank reconciliations; short-term investments and receivables; inventory; long-term assets including intangibles; liabilities including bonds payable; shareholders' equity, dividends, and share repurchases; comprehensive income and the statement of shareholders' equity; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis.
Prerequisite: English Studies 12/ English First Peoples 12 with a minimum of 73% or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 1000, ACCT 1030, ACCT 1210/1220, ACCT 1211/1221, ACCT 2211, BBUS 2210 or BBUS 2211
For more information, search for this course here.

Winter semester
ECON 1900
Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1900 Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the interactions between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include a definition of economics; demand and supply analysis; consumer theory; production and cost; market structure including perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly; market efficiency and market failure; resource markets; and international trade.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B OR MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 1900 and ECON 1901
For more information, search for this course here.

or
ECON 1950
Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)(recommended)

ECON 1950 Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine economic behaviour at the aggregate level, and the measurement and determination of national income. Topics include an introduction to economics; measuring macroeconomic variables including gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation; the Keynesian model; aggregate demand and supply; money and banking; the money market; fiscal policy; monetary policy and the central bank; exchange rates and the balance of payments; and economic growth.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B or MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended
For more information, search for this course here.

CMNS 1290
Introduction to Professional Writing (3,0,0)

CMNS 1290 Introduction to Professional Writing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students study the theories and practice of professional organizational communication, learning the importance of effective communication to meeting goals, developing and maintaining relationships and the overall facilitation of work. Students develop skills in evaluating communication scenarios, designing communication strategies that meet goals and audience need, including requests, information sharing and persuasion. In addition, students learn to employ writing techniques and editorial skills relevant to professional communication contexts.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of CMNS 1290, CMNS 1291, CMNS 1810, CMNS 1811
For more information, search for this course here.

ACCT 2280
Accounting Software Systems (3,0,0)

ACCT 2280 Accounting Software Systems (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students learn to maintain the financial records of a small business using Sage 50 accounting and business management software. It enables detailed tracking, reporting and analysis of business transactions. Topics include general ledger; accounts payable; accounts receivable; payables and receivables setup; payroll journal and setup; inventory transactions; orders, quotes and deposits; currency and remittances; reconciliations and deposits; and comprehensive setup.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2210 (minimum C-); ENGL 1100, ENGL 1110, ENGL 1120, ENGL 1140 or ENGL 1210 (minimum C-); or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of ACCT 2280, ACCT 2281, ACCT 1920 or ACCT 1921
For more information, search for this course here.

MIST 2610
Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

MIST 2610 Management Information Systems (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students acquire the knowledge and skills to effectively utilize information systems and technology in support of organizational strategy. Topics include an introduction to information systems; information systems strategy; ethics, privacy, and policy; data security; data and knowledge management; networks and communications technologies; wireless and mobile computing; e-business and e-commerce; Web 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and social networks; systems development and managing information systems projects; and personal productivity software, including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
Note: Students may receive credit for only one of MIST 2610 or MIST 2611 or BBUS 1370 or BBUS 1371 or BBUS 2370 or COMP 1000 or COMP 1350 or COMP 1700 or COMP 1910.
For more information, search for this course here.

ORGB 2810
Organizational Behaviour (3,0,0)

ORGB 2810 Organizational Behaviour (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the behavior of individuals and how they interact with each other in different workplace organizations. Topics include defining organizational behavior; perception, personality and emotions; values, attitudes and their effects in the workplace; motivating self and others; working in teams; communication, conflict and negotiation; power and politics; leadership; decision making, creativity and ethics; and organizational culture and change.
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100
Note: Students may receive credit for only one of ORGB 2810, ORGB 2811, BBUS 2720, BBUS 2721 or TMGT 1160.
For more information, search for this course here.

Second year
Fall semester
ACCT 2250
Management Accounting (3,0,0)

ACCT 2250 Management Accounting (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop the skills necessary to collect, analyze, and communicate quantitative and non-quantitative information to assist management in making more effective planning and control decisions. Topics include the role of managerial accounting; basic cost management concepts; job, process, hybrid and activity-based costing; cost behaviour and estimation; cost-volume-profit analysis; profit planning and activity-based budgeting; standard costing, flexible budgeting and variance analysis; cost management tools including the balanced scorecard, benchmarking and reengineering; and relevant costs for decision making such as make or buy, special orders, joint products and outsourcing.
Prerequisite: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade); ENGL 1100 or ENGL 1110 or ENGL 1120 or ENGL 1140 or ENGL 1210 or equivalent (minimum C- grade)
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2320
Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)(recommended)

ECON 2320 Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistics with an emphasis on its applications in business and economics. Topics include descriptive statistics and numerical measures; an introduction to probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; interval estimations; and testing hypotheses and statistical inferences.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
Note:Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MATH 1200, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, BIOL 3000, and SOCI 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

or
STAT 1200
Introduction to Statistics (3,1.5,0)

STAT 1200 Introduction to Statistics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistical reasoning in this course. Students will learn to interpret quantities relating to descriptive statistics; correlation; regression; probability; and probability distributions including the binomial and normal. Students will learn different facets of sampling and experimental design. Students will learn to make appropriate inferences from confidence intervals and hypothesis tests including analysis of variance. Prerequisites: Foundations of Mathematics 11 with a minimum grade of C+ or Pre-calculus 11 with a minimum grade of C+ or equivalent or Foundations of Math 12 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C+ or MATH 0510 with a minimum score of C- or MATH 0523 with a minimum score of C- or equivalent. MATH 1100 or MATH 1101 is recommended.
Note: Students can get credit for only one of BIOL 3000, ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, STAT 1200, STAT 1201, and STAT 2000.
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 2430
Introduction to Marketing (3,0,0)

MKTG 2430 Introduction to Marketing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students receive an overall view of the marketing function, the role of marketing in society and its application within organizations. Topics include an overview of marketing; developing a marketing plan and strategies; analyzing the marketing environment; consumer behaviour; segmentation, targeting, and positioning; developing new products; product, branding, and packaging decisions; pricing concepts and strategies; distribution strategies; and integrated marketing communications.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 2430, MKTG 2431, MKTG 3430, TMGT 1150, BBUS 3430 or BBUS 3431
For more information, search for this course here.

or
HRMN 2820
Human Resource Management (3,0,0)

HRMN 2820 Human Resource Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to the management of an organization's workforce through the design and implementation of effective human resource policies and procedures. Current Canadian issues and practices are emphasized. The topics include the strategic role of human resources management; human resources planning; job analysis and design; recruitment and selection; employment equity; compensation; training and development; performance appraisal; occupational health and safety; and employee and industrial relations.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of HRMN 2820, HRMN 2821, HRMN 3820, BBUS 3810, BBUS 3811, TMGT 1140
For more information, search for this course here.

BLAW 2910
Commercial Law (3,0,0)

BLAW 2910 Commercial Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the legal environment in which businesses operate and how common law and different provincial and federal government statutes influence decision-making. Topics include origins of Canadian law; resolving disputes and navigating the court system; tort law; contract law; sales of goods and consumer protection; methods of carrying on business; workplace law; property law; and creditor law.
For more information, search for this course here.

Winter semester
MKTG 3450
Professional Selling (3,0,0)

MKTG 3450 Professional Selling (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students will gain an overall view of the professional selling function. They will come to understand the role of personal selling in marketing and society and its application within organizations. Topics include relationship selling opportunities; creating value with a relationship strategy; developing a relationship strategy; communication styles; creating production solutions; buying process and buyer behavior; approaching the customer; developing and qualifying a prospect base; determining customer needs; sales demonstration; negotiating buyer concerns; and closing and confirming the sale.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 3450, MKTG 3451, HMGT 2120, BBUS 3450 or BBUS 3451
For more information, search for this course here.

IBUS 3510
International Business (3,0,0)

IBUS 3510 International Business (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine globalization and the steps managers take to establish or expand operations in international markets. They explore the influence of forces such as culture, economics, politics, and geography on management decision making. Topics include globalization; national differences in political economy; political economy and economic development; differences in culture; ethics in international business; international trade theory; political economy of international trade; foreign direct investment; regional economic integration; international business strategy; entry strategy and strategic alliance; and global marketing and research and development
Prerequisite: ECON 1950 (minimum C-) or equivalent and MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of IBUS 3510, IBUS 3511, BBUS 3510 or BBUS 3511
For more information, search for this course here.

MNGT 3710
Business Ethics and Society (3,0,0)

MNGT 3710 Business Ethics and Society (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the complex business environment and the relationships organizations have with each other, civil society, and the natural environment. Through this examination, students learn how critical ethical decision-making is to the successful management of any organization. Topics include elements of critical thinking, business ethics fundamentals, frameworks for ethical thinking, awareness of ethical pitfalls, ethical reasoning, ethical principles, drafting a code of ethics, illustrating an ethical decision-making process, applying ethical decision-making skills, ethical decision-making in the workplace, corporate social responsibility and sustainable development, and stakeholder theory.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BBUS 3030, MNGT 3711, BBUS 3031 or MNGT 3710
For more information, search for this course here.

ORGB 3770
Teamwork in Organizations (3,0,0)

ORGB 3770 Teamwork in Organizations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop an understanding of the nature, design and processes of effective teamwork as well as a practical skill set for team membership. Topics include the importance of teams; assessing a team's experience and insights; building a balanced team; building a high performance team; becoming a team member, follower, and leader; team building; team evaluation and accountability; observing team leadership skills at work; identifying and overcoming team dysfunctions; motivating team members and leaders; and developing intercultural teams.
Prerequisite: CMNS 1290 and ORGB 2810
Note: Students may receive credit for one of BBUS 3880 or ORGB 3770
For more information, search for this course here.

One of the following:
FNCE 2120
Financial Management (3,0,0)

FNCE 2120 Financial Management (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students develop a basic understanding of business finance, which deals with how organizations effectively manage their operating and fixed assets and fund them with an optimal mix of debt and equity financing. Topics include the role of the financial manager; goals of the firm; financial statement analysis; time value of money; risk and return including beta and the capital asset pricing model; common and preferred share valuation; bond valuation and interest rates; capital budgeting; cost of capital; and optimal capital structure. Prerequisites: ACCT 2210 or equivalent (minimum C-), and CMNS 1290 or equivalent (minimum C-), and MATH 1070 or equivalent (minimum C-), and ECON 2320 or equivalent (minimum C-)
Note: Students may not receive credit for more than one of FNCE 2120, FNCE 2121, FNCE 3120, BBUS 3120 or BBUS 3121
For more information, search for this course here.

MKTG 3470
Consumer Behaviour (3,0,0)

MKTG 3470 Consumer Behaviour (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the psychological, social and cultural theories and concepts that provide insight into consumer behaviour and then apply these principles to different consumer decision-making contexts. Topics include defining consumer behaviour and consumer behaviour research and examining how perception, learning and memory, motivation and affect, self-perception, personality, life-style, values, attitude, group influences, income, social class, family structure, subcultures, and culture affect consumer decision making.
Prerequisite: MKTG 2430 (minimum C-) or equivalent
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MKTG 3470, MKTG 3471, TMGT 4130, BBUS 3470 or BBUS 3471
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 3830
Human Resource Planning and Staffing (3,0,0)

HRMN 3830 Human Resource Planning and Staffing (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the policies and procedures for the planning, acquisition, deployment, and retention of a workforce of sufficient size and quality to allow an organization to attain its strategic goals. Topics include the strategic importance of staffing; the staffing environment; human resource planning; job analysis and design; recruitment; applicant screening; employee testing; interviews; references; decision making; employment contracts; methods of evaluating the hiring process; deployment; and retention.
Prerequisite: HRMN 2820 or HRMN 3820
Note: Students can not receive credit for more than one of HRMN 3831, BBUS 4810 or HRMN 3830
For more information, search for this course here.

HRMN 3840
Employee and Labour Relations (3,0,0)

HRMN 3840 Employee and Labour Relations (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students explore the different aspects of union-management relations focusing on both the Canadian and international experience. The topics include an introduction to labour relations; labour relations environment; union membership, structure and actions; employment legislation and the Labour Relations Act; collective bargaining; managing the collective agreement; dispute resolution; human resources in an union environment; international labour relations; and future trends and issues in labour relations.
Prerequisite: HRMN 2820 or HRMN 3820
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BBUS 3840, BBUS 3841, HRMN 3841 or HRMN 3840
For more information, search for this course here.

BLAW 3920
Employment Law (3,0,0)

BLAW 3920 Employment Law (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students investigate the legal principles and law relating to the individual employer-employee relationship and how its influences business decision-making. Topics include an overview of the legal framework; common law issues in employment; the unionized workplace; Canada Labour Code; the employment contract; employment standards legislation; human rights in the workplace; occupational health and safety; workers compensation; workplace privacy; navigating the employment relationship; resignation and retirement; dismissal with cause; dismissal without cause; and post-employment obligations.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for more than one of BLAW 3920, BLAW 3921 or BBUS 3920
For more information, search for this course here.

Students must achieve a grade of C- or better in all courses to graduate. Those who plan on pursuing the Bachelor of Business Administration are recommended to take the following:

MATH 1070
Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

MATH 1070 Mathematics for Business and Economics (3,1.5,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

This course is designed for Business and Economics students. Topics include linear and non-linear functions and models applied to cost, revenue, profit, demand and supply, systems of equations (linear and nonlinear), matrices, linear programming, difference equations, and mathematics of finance (including simple and compound interest, annuities, mortgages, and loans).
Prerequisite: Foundations of Math 12 with a minimum grade of C+ or Pre-Calculus 12 with a minimum 67% (C+) or equivalent or MATH 1000 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 1001 with a minimum grade of C- or MATH 0600 or MATH 0610 or MATH 0630 or MATH 0633 or MATH 0650 with a minimum grade of C-
Note: Students can get credit for only one of the following MATH 1070, MATH 1071, MATH 1091, MATH 1091, MATH 1100 or MATH 1101.
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1900
Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1900 Principles of Microeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine the interactions between individuals and firms in various types of markets. Topics include a definition of economics; demand and supply analysis; consumer theory; production and cost; market structure including perfect competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition, and oligopoly; market efficiency and market failure; resource markets; and international trade.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B OR MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both ECON 1900 and ECON 1901
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 1950
Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

ECON 1950 Principles of Macroeconomics (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students examine economic behaviour at the aggregate level, and the measurement and determination of national income. Topics include an introduction to economics; measuring macroeconomic variables including gross domestic product, unemployment, and inflation; the Keynesian model; aggregate demand and supply; money and banking; the money market; fiscal policy; monetary policy and the central bank; exchange rates and the balance of payments; and economic growth.
Prerequisite: Foundations of Mathematics 11 or Pre-calculus Math 11 with a minimum B or MATH 0510 or MATH 0530 or equivalent. Completion of one Foundations of Mathematics 12, or Pre-calculus 12 is highly recommended
For more information, search for this course here.

ECON 2320
Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

ECON 2320 Economics and Business Statistics 1 (3,0,0)

Credits: 3 credits
Delivery: Campus

Students are introduced to statistics with an emphasis on its applications in business and economics. Topics include descriptive statistics and numerical measures; an introduction to probability; discrete and continuous probability distributions; sampling and sampling distributions; interval estimations; and testing hypotheses and statistical inferences.
Prerequisite: ECON 1220 or ECON 1900 and ECON 1950
Note:Students cannot receive credit for more than one of MATH 1200, STAT 1200, STAT 2000, ECON 2320, PSYC 2100, SOCI 2710, BIOL 3000, and SOCI 3710
For more information, search for this course here.


 

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